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Environment Agency briefing Publishing flood risk information briefing 1

Environment Agency briefing Publishing flood risk information briefing 1

Thumbnail Uploaded by Jo Allchurch, 18/06/13 16:58
The Flood Risk Regulations require flood maps to be produced and published for rivers, the sea, reservoirs and surface water by 22 December 2013. This monthly update provides information about what the Environment Agency are doing and what it means for you.
Tags: flownet flood risk environment agency maps publishing
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FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
The pdf will not open in my Council's version of Adobe. I hope the update makes it clear that this requirement, as I understand it, only refers to areas designiated as at significant risk. Otherwise colleagues around the country who are not in a position to do this and not in a significant risk area might get rather nervous.
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
Who sanctioned the use of the phases "where gets wet" and "what gets wet" to mean flooding and the impact? The Briefing refers to "you", who is it directed at? Maps for surface water - where gets wet states "Most LLFAs prefer all mapping to be publish together" - I am not sure I believe this based on the meeting I attend. Pete
Jo Allchurch 7 Years Ago
Hi both I will ask someone from EA to respond on this - I just posted on their behalf. Thanks Jo
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
Hi - thanks for your feedback. If you're struggling to open the document I can send a word version, or if you get in touch with your local Environment Agency contacts I'm sure they can help. In terms of language and terminology we're trying to simplify the terms 'hazard' and 'risk' maps as many people get confused with the terms. We're open to feedback and comments on this. The overwhelming view is we need to be simpler and clearer and the words used in the briefing have been well received by other audiences. We recognise not all LLFAs have the same views on publication of the surface water maps. The briefing refers to the majority of the feedback we have had. All decisions made around publication will be made by our project board which includes representation from Defra, the LGA and an LLFA. If you've got any further questions / comments I'll be happy to help. Jo
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
A word version would be useful - it won't open here. My e-mail is Howard.glenn@calderdale.gov.uk . Cheers
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
I have to agree with Peter, the use of "what gets wet" is shockingly dumbed down. Things get wet if I drop a bucket of water and everything gets wet if it rains. I feel this really needs to be reconsidered. We're talking about flooding and flood risk and anyone interested in the subject will surely know what these mean. By all means drop the use of jargon and explain the terms in clear language, but "what gets wet" is completely wrong and in my opinion, misrepresents the subject. If newspapers and the BBC can use the word 'flood', then surely its pretty well understood and the Environment Agency can use the word? I would also say that 'risk' is used in everyday language and the concept in its simplest form well undestoond. Whilst the detail may be misunderstood, for instance '1 in a 100 year flood', its not the word ' flood risk' that is the problem. Stick with the term flood risk, just make sure you explain the detail clearly and simply!!!
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
I would agree with the comments above that some of the wording used comes across as extremely patronising - both to the general public and especially to fellow flood risk professionals. However the term 'Flood Risk Areas' as it is used in the FR Regs has a specific meaning which is much narrower than the understanding of the phrase as in general use, and this is not to my mind made sufficiently clear in this communication. Surely this represents a much greater risk of misunderstanding, especially when coupled with pharses like 'LLFAs are required ...to produce maps for SW flooding', that words like 'Hazard' and 'Risk'! I hope that througouth this process any communications will be carefully managed in full consultation with partners - particularly with LLFAs - as any expectation mismangement in respect of the mapping will no doubt have to be mangement at a local level by Local Authority officers.
Ian Hope 7 Years Ago
Is the insurance industry signed up to this? I keep hearing strong rumours of another flood risk map (what gets wet and who gets wet) prepared fpr insurance purposes.
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
My understanding is that in Germany, although there are no surface water flood maos, only river and coastal, the government and insurance sector are moving towards, if not have already arived at a common map. If it's possible there it should be possible in the UK. However, they do insurance differently in Germany. I'll provide a link to a presentation on how they do it next week
Paul Davies 7 Years Ago
There are significant differences in the way many European Countries look at flood risk but I have not seen any that are significantly better than the way the UK looks at flood risk. However, I am not saying that we have got it right and I believe we could significantly improve both the level of accuracy and detail with the UK flood maps, but I would not be in favour of relying on only river flood maps.. If you want to see what the Government is proposing for the insurance industry in the UK I suggest you look at https://consult.defra.gov.uk/flooding/floodinsurance I entirely agree that the attempt to simplify the terminology appears to have been misjudged and that the tone of the document is somewhat patronizing. I am fully in favor of using simplistic explanations and I believe it was Albert Einstein that said ‘if you cannot explain a subject in simple terms then you do not understand it.’ Perhaps he should have added ‘and if the simple explanation does not make sense, you definitely do not understand the subject.’ Ian, I believe your rumours are answered by the Defra document in the link above. The EA will have to produce flood data down to single property levels for the Insurance industry to adopt ‘Flood Re’.
Ian Hope 7 Years Ago
Regarding yesterdays announcement: I am intrigued by the statement that the Government '....intends to provide time-limited, transitional support to households at high flood risk....'
FM
Former Member 7 Years Ago
Here is the link to the presentation that I mentioned last week. https://sites.google.com/a/sheffield.ac.uk/jrbinterreg/home/frc-presentations/heinrich-webler-insurance-in-germany I'm also providing a link to one of the MARE demonstration projects. This is from Hannover and describes what they did to deal with tyhe shortcomings in the State of Lower Saxony flood mapping which is the equivalent of our national river mapping. http://www.mare-portal.eu/mare-output/42/t/demonstration-2-the-hannover-flood-risk-management-study