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Legal basis for strategic plans and joint spatial plans?

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Felix Beck, modified 2 Years ago.

Legal basis for strategic plans and joint spatial plans?

New Member Posts: 20 Join Date: 12/06/17 Recent Posts

Dear all,

I am currently doing some work on local plan coverage in England. Besides local plans I also look at plan documents a step above local plans.

So I came across plans, such as the greater Exeter Strategic Plan

"The Greater Exeter Strategic Plan will be a new formal statutory document, providing the overall spatial strategy and level of housing and employment land to be provided in the period to 2040. When adopted, it will sit above Local Plans for each area which will continue to be prepared to consider local level issues. Neighbourhood Plans will also be promoted so communities can continue to be empowered to make the detailed planning decisions for the benefit of their area." (https://www.gesp.org.uk/overview/)

or the West of England joint spatial plan.

Unfortunately, the NPPF lacks a definition for "strategic plans" or joint spatial plans.

I know that Local Plans as Local development documents  are listed in the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, and the basis of the London Plan or the Greater Manchester Spatial Framework. 

Also the NPPF lists the following definitions in the glossary:

Strategic policies: Policies and site allocations which address strategic priorities in line with the requirements of Section 19 (1B-E) of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004.

Strategic policy-making authorities: Those authorities responsible for producing strategic policies (local planning authorities, and elected Mayors or combined authorities, where this power has been conferred). This definition applies whether the authority is in the process of producing strategic policies or not.

Therefore I know who can prepare strategic policies or who are the strategic policy making authorities.

As the NPPF more or less just refers to Local Plans, which can be prepared as Joint Plans by multiple local authorities and have to include strategic policies.

BUT I struggle to find proper definitions and a legal basis for things as these "strategic plans"or joint spatial plans. 

Can anyone of you direct me in the right direction?

 

many thanks

AC
Andrew Chalmers, modified 2 Years ago.

RE: Legal basis for strategic plans and joint spatial plans?

Advocate Posts: 151 Join Date: 20/10/11 Recent Posts

You could start with the Combined Authorities (Spatial Development Strategy) Regulations 2018.  This extends the powers already afforded to the Mayor of London under the Greater London Authority Act 1999 to Greater Manchester, West of England and Liverpool City Region.  The explanatory memorandum assists in setting out the background and legislation as it applied to London. Hope this is a start.

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/827/memorandum/contents

 

NS
Nicola Sworowski, modified 2 Years ago.

RE: Legal basis for strategic plans and joint spatial plans?

New Member Posts: 2 Join Date: 05/02/19 Recent Posts

There is no definition of strategic plans but it is assumed to be plans that involve more than one authority and most likely a statutory plan. The legal basis is the same as a Local Plan as they go through the same process.  The London Plan is a Spatial Development Strategy (SDS) for Greater London which is prepared by the Mayor of London and is different to the GMSF as that is currently being produced as a Development Plan Document.

The term joint spatial plan is just a term that has been used by some groups to describe their Plans.   I know that the Oxfordshire Authorities are referring to their document as a Joint Statutory Spatial Plan (JSSP).  In both West of England and Greater Exeter they are Joint Plans though the West of England plan was only dealing with a limited number of policies but is still being examined through the same process as a Local Plan.

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Felix Beck, modified 2 Years ago.

RE: Legal basis for strategic plans and joint spatial plans?

New Member Posts: 20 Join Date: 12/06/17 Recent Posts

Thanks both,

just came across a statement for the Oxfordshire 2050 plan, where it is also stated that formally the plan is adopted as a joint local plan.